Heat treatment of metal explosive composite materials

Table 1 Annealing process of several explosive composite panels

Composite material

Annealing temperature/℃

Holding time/h

Titanium-steel stainless steel-steel nickel-titanium nickel-stainless steel zirconium-steel copper-aluminum copper-LY12 copper-LY2M

500 500 500 500 500 300 300 300

600 600 600 600 600 350 350 350

700 700 700 700 700 400 400 400

800 800 800 800 800 450 450 450

850 900 900 900 900 500 500 500

900 1000 1000 1000 1000 550 550 550

1000 1100

1 1 1 1 1 0.5 0.5 0.5

Since the sample is air-cooled after annealing, the structure of the metal at high temperature is basically retained. This method of treatment is quite beneficial to the study of similar subjects.

Figure 2 shows the bonding zone morphology of other explosive composite panels after high temperature heat treatment. Figures 2a-e show an intermediate layer similar to Figure 1h. These intermediate layers are formed by the violent diffusion and combination of the atoms of the base metal at high temperatures, and they contain all the intermetallic compounds that they can form at high temperatures [2, 3]. As for the situation shown in Figure 2f (there are also bimetals such as stainless steel-steel and nickel-steel), although the annealing temperature is very high, the above-mentioned intermediate layer does not appear at their bonding interface. After high-temperature annealing, except for the recrystallization and grain growth of the base metal, the bonding interface (including the waveform) did not change significantly.

Figure 2 The micro morphology of the bonding zone of several composite plates after high temperature annealing (all reduced by 1 times)

(a) Copper-LY2M 550℃ annealing×100 (b) Copper-LY12550℃ annealing×100 (c) Ni-Ti 1000℃ annealing×50(d) Zirconium-steel 1000℃ annealing×100(e) Copper-aluminum 550℃ Annealing×50(f) Nickel-stainless steel 1100℃ annealing×50